Television commercials and the abnormal dependency on their power

It’s Friday. It’s been a long week and I need to ramble a bit. So, here it goes.

Last night, I’m clicking through the channels and spot Old Navy’s back-to-school commercial featuring Jennie Garth, Jason Priestly and Luke Perry from the ‘90s show Beverly Hills 90210.

Whoa. Just bring in Shannen Doherty and it’s a homecoming. (By the way, Gabrielle Carteris, who played Brandon’s (Jason) stalker/admirer, Andrea Zuckerman is in another Old Navy commercial, still stalking I might add.)

In addition, Old Navy’s campaign reunites Mayim Bialik and Joey Lawrence, former siblings in the show, “Blossom.” Another ’90s show.

Are these actors planning comebacks? Are there any fall shows on tap featuring them? On the other hand, the snarky me thinks, they need money. (But who doesn’t?)

Okay, now the old brain really starts to rattle.

We all know that hundreds, maybe thousands of actors and actors have graced (should I use that term, loosely?) the small screen doing commercials before making it big.

I wanted to recall some of the famous faces who did commercials prior to their big break. So, I did what I love doing almost as much as writing: I Googled.

I ran across an article from Woman’s Day magazine, which featured 12 Old Commercials Featuring Now-Famous Stars. Very cool article with video clips.

Most of the commercials listed were a surprise, and quite cool to watch. However, I do vaguely recall Bruce Willis in a Seagram’s commercial.

Okay, so I refer back to the Old Navy commercial with the Beverly Hills 90210 gang, and start to realize (for the hundredth time) how embedded this medium is in our society. So much so, that even actors can’t get away from them.

For actors, commercials are a paying gig, something to add to a resume, and a means for celebrities to get one’s feet wet or come in from grazing in greener pastures.

Television commercials may promote a wide variety of goods, services and ideas, and influence what we consume, and how we behave. But they clearly possess an abnormal power to satisfy the need for celebrity types and athletes (can’t forget them) to stay in our lives for years, decades, centuries. Hmm …but then again, there are reruns.

Enough rambling. I’m going to Old Navy. Enjoy your weekend.

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2 thoughts on “Television commercials and the abnormal dependency on their power

  1. Beth-Ann K says:

    Funny to see this today! I saw the Jason Priestley/Gabrielle Carteris ad yesterday and smiled. Really brought me back. It was like the Ferris Bueller ad during the Super Bowl. I loved looking for all of the nods to the film. 🙂

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